The Evil Has Landed

Last month acid rock pioneers Queens of the Stone Age released their seventh studio album entitled “Villains.”

Being a huge fan of the band, I had pre-ordered the vinyl release and did my first video of me unboxing my order. (You can see the video Here )

There are few albums that I immediately fall in love with. It usually takes me a solid three or four listen through to really evaluate it and gauge how much I like it. This was not the case with “Villains.”

I had so much hype and anticipation built up for this album upon receiving two of the songs to listen to early. The first single off the album “The Way You Use To Do” as well as “The Evil Has Landed.” Man oh man, was I not disappointed.

I immediately loved both songs, and upon receiving the album I knew it was going to be added to the favorite list. From the the opening track “Feet Don’t Fail Me” with its Led Zeppelin-esque sounding guitars and bass work, to the punctuated “Domesticated Animals” all the way to the ending track “Villains of Circumstances,” this album is probably one of the most solid and well-produced ones to be released this year.

QotSA is one of those few bands that changes up their sound enough to where no two albums really sound the same, and yet they maintain that signature Queens of the Stone Age feel. I attribute this to the constant lineup change. The band is always changing up members, but this is due to a revolving door policy and not drama. Each member brings in a new flair, and it only enhances the band’s legacy.

I feel like that really shines through on “Villains.” The co-operative guitar energy between frontman Josh Homme and QotSA veteran member Troy van Leeuwen is so solid and on point, that the addition of guitarist Dean Fertita enriches the overall sound in a way that feels completely natural.

Overall, “Villains” marks a fantastic addition to the band’s already impressive discography, and I would highly recommend to veteran fans and newcomers alike.

Check out “Villains” available now in store and online.

The Master of Shock Rock is Back

1969.

LOT happened in that year.

Man landed on the moon, The Beatles released “Abbey Road,” as well as gave their final live performance atop Apple Records, and let’s not forget Woodstock.

Something else happened of major significance in the year 1969, however. Something that would literally cause a major change in music History.

The album “Pretties for You” was released.

It was the Psychedelic debut album from vocalist Vincent Furnier, lead guitarist Glenn Buxton, rhythm guitarist Michael Bruce, bassist Dennis Dunaway, and drummer Neil Smith.

Or, as they were more known as, Alice Cooper.

2017. A full forty-eight years after “Pretties for You” was released, and Alice Cooper (Furnier’s adopted alias and now solo outfit) has released his 27th studio album entitled “Paranormal.”

alicecooperparanormalcover

10 brand new songs, 2 new songs with some of the original members, and 6 bonus live versions of Cooper classics 

This album, I’ve got to say, rocks pretty hard. The album has a harder feel to it, yet still rings true to the classic Cooper sound.

What impresses me the most about Alice Cooper is that very fact, actually. A lot of these guys that have been around 30-40+ years have a tendency to sound less creative, they sound generic, and often times downright cheesy. *cough* Aerosmith *cough* Yet Alice Cooper stays true to form while simultaneously adapting to the changing world around him.

Sure, there are a few tracks that feel slightly cheesy, but then again name me an Alice Cooper album that doesn’t have at least one track like that. Come on now, it’s Alice Cooper. The Godfather of Shock Rock. The Villain of Rock ‘n Roll. I think we can make an exception here.

Let’s not forget that he still puts on amazing and theatric stage shows, while his younger counterparts have grown lazy and scaled theirs back. *cough* Marilyn Manson *cough*

Will “Paranormal” stand the test of time and go down as one of Cooper’s masterpieces? Most likely not. Is it still worth listening to, adding to your collection, and a legitimate addition to Alice Cooper’s 40 year legacy? Absolutely.